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DACIN
Created 1981, revised 1994

FREQUENCY: Very Rare
NO. APPEARING: 2-6 or 20-50 in community
ARMOR CLASS: 6 (4)
MOVE: 8"
HIT DICE: 4 (d6)
% IN LAIR: 10%
TREASURE TYPE: N x5 or viariable
NO. OF ATTACKS: 1 or 3/2
DAMAGE: by weapon type
SPECIAL ATTACKS: +2 to hit
SPECIAL DEFENSES: -2 to hit
MAGIC RESISTANCE: Standard
INTELLIGENCE: Low to Average
ALIGNMENT: variable
SIZE: M (4'-5' tall)
PSIONIC ABILITY: nil
LEVEL/XP: III / 350 + 3/hp

The humanoid Dacin are seclusionary nomadic demi-kobolds, lairing primarily in the forest, but close enough to more civilized communities to allow inter-cultural relations. The simple fact that a Dacin is an empirically ugly creature keeps this species in a struggle for acclimation, and therefore usually keep to themselves. Their communities are very rare and kept under close guard.

Dacin sociology can vary, but gravitates towards an untrusting self-promotional quality of chaotic behavior and individuality. They are eager to overcome the stigma of their appearance, but at the same time begrudge those not immediately impressed by their services or abilities. Dacin typically scrape to survive, and are not above stealing at all. They will bargain and reason their way out of any argument, just as much as they would for a free rat sandwich. Needless to say, bribery is an effective tool with a Dacin, at least in the short term.

Most Dacin are good with weapons, and their four eyes aid with enhanced depth perception in any situation. In the case of battle, its attack rolls get a +2 bonus, and it has its effective AC reduced by 2 points as well, as long as it can see its assailant.

Dacin have lifespans similar to dwarves, living to 200 years and beyond. But they are uncharismatic even to each other, so their numbers are still sparse...

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All artwork Copyright 2002 David C. Lovelace